In this issue

 

Chart Industries, the US LNG and energy equipment maker, has returned to a first-quarter profit following internal restructuring and amid a rise in its order-book. Order activity has risen 53%,…
Lake Charles LNG, the liquefaction project owned by the U.S. pipeline company Energy Transfer, has asked regulators to extend the deadline for the start of construction to November 2019. 
Australian commodities company BHP Billiton is continuing to exit its onshore assets in the southwest of the United States, and is awaiting bids. “We expect to receive bids by June…
Dominion Energy, owner of the Cove Point LNG facility in Maryland, is pulling out all the stops to acquire Scana Corp and its South Carolina natural gas and power assets.…
Gauging incremental gas demand, derived from new gas-fired power plant projects worldwide, Energy Aspects pointed out that most of Asia’s new capacity is “supportive of additional LNG demand,” while North…
CLP Power, developer of a new unit at Black Point Power Station (2,500 MW) in Hong Kong, has selected Shell to supply LNG to fuel the mega plant. The new…
Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest oil producer, is about to join Kuwait and the UEA in buying attractively-priced LNG. Khalid Al-Falih, the Saudi energy minister, did not rule out buying…
Tellurian Inc, developer of the Driftwood LNG project, has confirmed Bechtel Oil, Gas and Chemicals had made a $50 million investment in the company. The investment was made on the…
Record results in shale oil and gas output in Appalachia and the Permian basin have been helped by President Donald Trump’s latest changes to the US corporate tax law. Several…
In 2018, three cargoes - each providing around 0.1 billion cm of liquefied gas - have come directly to British regas facilities from Yamal LNG in Russia. But as the…
The Panama Canal Authority said it expected LNG carrier traffic to increase by around 50% by the fourth quarter of 2018 as more US cargo export capacity comes on stream.
Open Season bidding for the second capacity extension on TransCanada’s Nova Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL) system has oversubscribed, with contracts awarded for an average term of 22 years. The NGTL…
Tellurian Inc., developer of the Driftwood LNG export project in Louisiana, has launched an open season to secure shippers for a proposed Permian Global Access Pipeline (PGAP), connecting the Permian…
Since the U.S. shale oil and gas revolution ended the need to import crude oil from Mexico, the trade balance shifted and U.S. energy exports have been exceeding imports from…

News Nudges

U.S. net gas exports double in H1-2019 and keep growing

Start-up of two liquefaction trains – Cameron LNG Train 1 and Corpus Christi LNG Train 2 –have pushed total U.S. net gas exports to 4.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in the first half of this year, more than double pre-year levels. Apart from LNG, pipeline gas is exported to Canada and Mexico. As of June, total U.S. LNG export capacity reached 5.4 Bcf/d across four facilities and nine liquefaction trains – a significant rise compared with 2.0 Bcf/d net exports in 2018. Net natural gas exports is forecast to continue rising through the end of 2019 as additional LNG export capacity comes online and pipeline infrastructure in Mexico is placed into service. In its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) foresees net gas exports averaging 4.6 Bcf/d in 2019 and 7.2 Bcf/d in 2020. Cameron Train, the fourth U.S. LNG placed into service since February 2016, was followed by Freeport LNG Train 1 and the small-scale Elba Island LNG venture. Together, these three project are seen to nearly double U.S. LNG export capacity to 8.9 Bcf/d by the end of 2020. Although U.S. LNG exports have grown substantially, most U.S. natural gas trade is transported via pipeline across shared borders with Canada and Mexico. In the first half of 2019, net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Mexico grew by 5%, and net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Canada remained relatively flat. Exports to Canada surged when the second phase of both the Rover pipeline and the new NEXUS pipeline entered service, allowing gas flows from the Appalachian Basin to the St. Clair point of exit northeast of Detroit. Deliveries to Mexico grew following the start-up of the Texas-Tuxpan pipeline, transporting gas from the U.S. Permian Basin.