In this issue

 

Paso Norte Pipeline Group (PNP), the developer of a new US-Mexico interconnector, has launched a 30 day open season inviting shippers to express interest in delivering natural gas from the…
Bogged down by gas shortage and high electricity prices, Australia is re-evaluating the scale and speed of its next wave of LNG export projects. Any slow-down in project development would…
US President Donald Trump has made reforms of the environmental permitting process for pipelines a key part of his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. Speeding up regulatory approvals will help fast-track…
Imposing a more stringent output cap on the Dutch Groningen field, Europe’s largest onshore gas reservoir, due to another earthquake in the area, would leave Europe dependent on importing more…
Prices for US gas flowing to the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec have risen by a third over the first nine months of 2017, pushed up by a 25%…
China's National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) imposed a cap on thermal coal prices imports through Qinhuangdao port at RMB750/t from 5 February. Strong demand due to colder-than-normal weather in…
Hard-nosed Chinese buyers are sniffing at the economics of US LNG supply deals, trying to find cheaper deals elsewhere.
Cheniere Pembina Pipeline Corp., the Canadian energy infrastructure company, said it was making progress with a range of natural gas projects in North America, including the Jordan Cove LNG export…
Sempra Energy, the California-based utility transforming the US Cameron LNG terminal into an export plant, is still planning an additional Mexican LNG export venture with national Petroleos Mexicano (Pemex), first…
LNG exporter Cheniere Energy, owner and operator of the Sabine Pass plant in Louisiana and developer of the Corpus Christi facility in Texas posted a full-year loss though edged towards…
Chart Industries, the US LNG equipment-maker, was moving in a positive path with rising sales and fourth-quarter profits after restructuring, acquiring three new companies and winning a contract for a…
As exports from the US accelerate, Asia’s growing gas import requirements are largely met by LNG on flexible trade terms that usher in a “new global gas order,” according to…
Defying fresh sanctions by the Trump administration, a Gaselys tanker carrying the first LNG exported by the Yamal facility in the Russian Arctic, has berthed at the Engie SA Everett…
The February 2018 futures contract for natural gas on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) is trading at a discount to the current spot price. This pricing pattern provides economic…

News Nudges

U.S. net gas exports double in H1-2019 and keep growing

Start-up of two liquefaction trains – Cameron LNG Train 1 and Corpus Christi LNG Train 2 –have pushed total U.S. net gas exports to 4.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in the first half of this year, more than double pre-year levels. Apart from LNG, pipeline gas is exported to Canada and Mexico. As of June, total U.S. LNG export capacity reached 5.4 Bcf/d across four facilities and nine liquefaction trains – a significant rise compared with 2.0 Bcf/d net exports in 2018. Net natural gas exports is forecast to continue rising through the end of 2019 as additional LNG export capacity comes online and pipeline infrastructure in Mexico is placed into service. In its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) foresees net gas exports averaging 4.6 Bcf/d in 2019 and 7.2 Bcf/d in 2020. Cameron Train, the fourth U.S. LNG placed into service since February 2016, was followed by Freeport LNG Train 1 and the small-scale Elba Island LNG venture. Together, these three project are seen to nearly double U.S. LNG export capacity to 8.9 Bcf/d by the end of 2020. Although U.S. LNG exports have grown substantially, most U.S. natural gas trade is transported via pipeline across shared borders with Canada and Mexico. In the first half of 2019, net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Mexico grew by 5%, and net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Canada remained relatively flat. Exports to Canada surged when the second phase of both the Rover pipeline and the new NEXUS pipeline entered service, allowing gas flows from the Appalachian Basin to the St. Clair point of exit northeast of Detroit. Deliveries to Mexico grew following the start-up of the Texas-Tuxpan pipeline, transporting gas from the U.S. Permian Basin.