In this issue

 

Petronet, the operator of India’s Dahei and Kochi LNG import terminals, has managed to push down the price for LNG cargoes from North America. Houston-based Tellurian Inc agreed to deliver…
Free ReadAtlantic basin LNG producers, notably at the US Gulf Coast, can achieve a better netback value at the Spanish Virtual Balancing Point (PVB) than elsewhere in Europe. However, offtake obligations…
Shipments of LNG from Cheniere’s Sabine Pass liquefaction and export facility in Louisiana were sold at prices as low as $4.27 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) this year, notching…
Rampant US gas supply has been outpacing demand growth for the past year, slashing prices in Europe and Asia. Some US exporters are considering shutting in production as record low…
Free ReadU.S. dry gas production will rise to an all-time high of 91.63 billion cubic feet per day (bcfd) this year, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said, forecasting a fall…
The Center for Liquefied Natural Gas, a US industry group, expects five export projects along the U.S. Gulf Coast will take a final investment decisions in the next 12 months,…
Sempra Energy’s Cameron LNG export plant in Louisiana has received regulatory permission to start commissioning the second processing Train at the facility on the Calcasieu Ship Channel and commercial operations…
Golar Power is moving ahead with an integrated LNG-to-Power project in Brazil’s northern state of Para, after securing a 25-year power purchase agreement (PPA) from the Brazilian authorities. The 605…
Free ReadAustralian-listed LNG Ltd, developer of the Magnolia LNG project in Louisiana, is striving to sign a full sales and purchase agreement (SPA) with Delta Offshore Energy. The first LNG cargo…
Flows of natural gas from the Appalachian Shale Basin to the rest of the U.S. keeps growing as production averaged over 16 billion cubic feet per day last month, pushing…
As Japan’s gas-burn in the power sector falls amid competition from coal, nuclear and renewables, the country is expected to lose its position as the world’s No.1 LNG importer to…
Free ReadChina’s switch from coal to gas – both to decarbonize its energy mix and tackle pollution under its Blue Sky policy – requires importing considerably more gas imports and investment…
Rising national gas production in Argentina and peak potential LNG export during the summer months is coinciding with strong winter demand from utilities in the northern part of China and…
European utilities are courted by more and more sellers marketing long-term LNG volumes from pre-FID LNG supply projects. To gain access to attractively-prices US LNG, however, European buyers need to…

News Nudges

U.S. net gas exports double in H1-2019 and keep growing

Start-up of two liquefaction trains – Cameron LNG Train 1 and Corpus Christi LNG Train 2 –have pushed total U.S. net gas exports to 4.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in the first half of this year, more than double pre-year levels. Apart from LNG, pipeline gas is exported to Canada and Mexico. As of June, total U.S. LNG export capacity reached 5.4 Bcf/d across four facilities and nine liquefaction trains – a significant rise compared with 2.0 Bcf/d net exports in 2018. Net natural gas exports is forecast to continue rising through the end of 2019 as additional LNG export capacity comes online and pipeline infrastructure in Mexico is placed into service. In its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) foresees net gas exports averaging 4.6 Bcf/d in 2019 and 7.2 Bcf/d in 2020. Cameron Train, the fourth U.S. LNG placed into service since February 2016, was followed by Freeport LNG Train 1 and the small-scale Elba Island LNG venture. Together, these three project are seen to nearly double U.S. LNG export capacity to 8.9 Bcf/d by the end of 2020. Although U.S. LNG exports have grown substantially, most U.S. natural gas trade is transported via pipeline across shared borders with Canada and Mexico. In the first half of 2019, net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Mexico grew by 5%, and net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Canada remained relatively flat. Exports to Canada surged when the second phase of both the Rover pipeline and the new NEXUS pipeline entered service, allowing gas flows from the Appalachian Basin to the St. Clair point of exit northeast of Detroit. Deliveries to Mexico grew following the start-up of the Texas-Tuxpan pipeline, transporting gas from the U.S. Permian Basin.