In this issue

 

Free ReadMexico’s state-run electric utility Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE) is aiming to renegotiate take-or-pay clauses it had agreed with North American gas pipeline developers, including TransCanada and Sempra’s IEnova. CFE…
Rapidly evolving exports of LNG and liquid fuels will turn the United States into a net energy exporter next year. As gas demand grows in Asia and Henry Hub prices…
Seasonal imports of LNG help meet peakload gas demand in New England’s industrial and power sector. During a freeze in the first week of February, more than 800,000 million cubic…
Free ReadThough trade tensions with the U.S. affected China’s GDP figures in the fourth quarter, demand growth in China’s gas and electricity sector is still “phenomenal,” Wood Mackenzie says. Total electricity…
Pembina Pipeline Corp., the Canadian owner of the Jordan Cove LNG export project reported progress on the US liquefaction venture and expects a decision from the U.S. federal energy regulator…
US regulators are advancing with the Pointe LNG project proposed for the East Bank of the Mississippi River, which would be the second riverbank export facility in the south of…
Free Read2019 could be a ‘year of incongruity’, as developers are rushing to reach financial close on an array of LNG export projects despite a backdrop of a market tipping into…
Despite rising oil prices and production levels U.S. gas fracking companies are continuing to lose money, according to a review of the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA).…
Following eight years of global economic growth, economists agree a downturn is simply a matter of when and how deep. The worst case scenario, according to Wood Mackenzie, would be…
Free ReadThe spread in natural gas spot prices between the Henry Hub in Louisiana and the Appalachian region continued to narrow over the year just past. Prices fell at Henry Hub…
California-based Sempra Energy has decided to sell its equity interests two utilities in Chile and Peru to focus on its LNG export ventures in North America. Sempra CEO Jeffrey W.…
Britain is strong market for sellers looking to home excess gas supply this winter, National Grid said when announcing a record send-out of its Grain LNG import terminal. A robust…
Free ReadNextDecade Corp. envisages reaching financial close on the 27 mtpa Rio Grande liquefaction and export project in Texas in the third quarter of this year. The project remains subject to…
Steelhead LNG, developer of the near-shore export plant on Vancouver Island, is investigating the pipeline route to bring feed-gas from the Chetwynd area of northeast British Columbia to Sarita Bay.…

News Nudges

U.S. net gas exports double in H1-2019 and keep growing

Start-up of two liquefaction trains – Cameron LNG Train 1 and Corpus Christi LNG Train 2 –have pushed total U.S. net gas exports to 4.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in the first half of this year, more than double pre-year levels. Apart from LNG, pipeline gas is exported to Canada and Mexico. As of June, total U.S. LNG export capacity reached 5.4 Bcf/d across four facilities and nine liquefaction trains – a significant rise compared with 2.0 Bcf/d net exports in 2018. Net natural gas exports is forecast to continue rising through the end of 2019 as additional LNG export capacity comes online and pipeline infrastructure in Mexico is placed into service. In its Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) foresees net gas exports averaging 4.6 Bcf/d in 2019 and 7.2 Bcf/d in 2020. Cameron Train, the fourth U.S. LNG placed into service since February 2016, was followed by Freeport LNG Train 1 and the small-scale Elba Island LNG venture. Together, these three project are seen to nearly double U.S. LNG export capacity to 8.9 Bcf/d by the end of 2020. Although U.S. LNG exports have grown substantially, most U.S. natural gas trade is transported via pipeline across shared borders with Canada and Mexico. In the first half of 2019, net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Mexico grew by 5%, and net exports of natural gas by pipeline to Canada remained relatively flat. Exports to Canada surged when the second phase of both the Rover pipeline and the new NEXUS pipeline entered service, allowing gas flows from the Appalachian Basin to the St. Clair point of exit northeast of Detroit. Deliveries to Mexico grew following the start-up of the Texas-Tuxpan pipeline, transporting gas from the U.S. Permian Basin.